Innovation for Jobs

Innovation for Jobs

Say hello to new group members: Bill, Dane, Robert, Martin, Tammy, Jeff, Edith, John, Amisha, Gene

David A Nordfors

Wed Jul 15 2015 16:19:36 GMT-0400 (EDT)

Hi All – say hello to our new group members:
Bill

Hi All – say hello to our new group members:
Bill Janeway <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_H._Janeway>, Dane Stangler <http://www.kauffman.org/who-we-are/leadership-and-associates/senior-leaders/dane-stangler>, Robert Khedouri <http://www.markle.org/about-markle/expert/robert-khedouri>, Martin Kenney <http://innovation.ucdavis.edu/people/mfkenney>, Tammy Johns <http://www.skills.com/our-team>, Jeff Hoffman <http://www.jeffhoffman.com/>, Edith Gummer <http://www.kauffman.org/who-we-are/leadership-and-associates/associates/edith-gummer>, Jon Schieber <http://techcrunch.com/author/jonathan-shieber/>, Amisha Miller <http://www.kauffman.org/who-we-are/leadership-and-associates/associates/amisha-miller>, Gene Kunde <https://www.linkedin.com/pub/gene-kunde/23/a16/3a>

WELCOME!!

/D


Curt Carlson

Wed Jul 15 2015 16:40:24 GMT-0400 (EDT)

Welcome-great to have you part of our group.

Curtis R. Carlson,

Welcome-great to have you part of our group.

Curtis R. Carlson, Ph.D.
Founder and CEO, Practice of Innovation
Former President and CEO of SRI International, 1998-2014
Website: www.practiceofinnovation.com

"Our most important innovation is the way we work."


Monique Morrow (mmorrow)

Wed Jul 15 2015 16:45:17 GMT-0400 (EDT)

Welcome !!
________________________________

Welcome !!
________________________________


Janeway, Bill

Wed Jul 15 2015 16:46:00 GMT-0400 (EDT)

Thanks.

Dr. William H. Janeway
Warburg Pincus
University of Cambridge
+1 917 543 4397
+44

Thanks.

Dr. William H. Janeway
Warburg Pincus
University of Cambridge
+1 917 543 4397
+44 7880 703350


Ben Baldwin | ClearFit

Wed Jul 15 2015 16:50:26 GMT-0400 (EDT)

Big class. Well done, David and Vint!
Welcome to all

Big class. Well done, David and Vint!
Welcome to all the new faces and hello again to the ones I already know.
__
Ben Baldwin
Founder | ClearFit: Predictive Job Matching | Quick Demo <http://bit.ly/bendemo>
LinkedIn <http://www.linkedin.com/in/benjaminstewartbaldwin> | […] | 416-482-8045

“The wildly ambitious future of the job search” <http://bit.ly/fortunejobmatch> — Fortune
“The next generation of hiring is job matching” <http://bit.ly/WSJjobmatching> — Wall Street Journal
“How They Did It” <http://bit.ly/IncColumn> — Inc. Magazine column on entrepreneurial success
+More <http://clearf.it/t8iSv> — Forbes, TechCrunch


Vint Cerf

Thu Jul 16 2015 03:35:56 GMT-0400 (EDT)

Welcome to a high-energy discussion group – I look forward

Welcome to a high-energy discussion group – I look forward to your
contributions!

vint cerf


Robert Cohen

Fri Jul 17 2015 16:32:51 GMT-0400 (EDT)

Hello new group members. It would be interesting to have

Hello new group members. It would be interesting to have your reaction to what I heard this week.

I attended the Industrial Internet Consortium meeting this week. In contrast to the Second Machine Age, nearly all of the speakers and consultants who have analyzed the Internet of Things asserted that they believe that the growth and expansion of the Internet of Things (IoT) will create huge numbers of jobs. There is not a good study that one can refer to, but while many recognize that there will be some jobs lost by removing inefficiencies from production and service systems and reducing the costs of things such as engine maintenance, there was widespread agreement that there will be a lot more jobs produced by innovations such as the Connected Car, the Connected Home, new connected ecosystems for health care, and for management of patients and interconnected devices.

This is in great contrast to the “machine learning, destruction of 40 percent of all jobs” perspective that seems to have dominated the I4J discussions until now, influenced by the Second Machine Age and the quantitative study of job destruction by Frey and Osborne, “The Future of Employment: How Susceptible are Jobs to Computerization?” In fact, Ian Goldin who, like Frey and Osborne, who is also at the Oxford Martin School, supports the IoT generates large numbers of jobs perspective.

It might be useful to give this area more significance in future discussions as it appears likely to be the source of many new jobs in the economy. In addition, while the employment impacts have not been estimated, there is a feeling that new jobs related to IoT will link human decision-making to more sophisticated machine learning and machine capabilities. This is also interesting in light of the study by Frey and Osborne that does not consider this as a possible evolution in the workforce.


Marjory Blumenthal

Sun Jul 19 2015 13:13:06 GMT-0400 (EDT)

Bob, a great question, as always, especially given the evolution

Bob, a great question, as always, especially given the evolution of and
growing spotlight on IOT and related. A related question might be, to what
extent are new IOT jobs transitional (a spike related to early deployment)
and to what extent are they more durable?

Newcomers, I add my welcome!

Regards,

Marjory


Curt Carlson

Sun Jul 19 2015 16:11:27 GMT-0400 (EDT)

Thanks. What reasons did they give for all the new

Thanks. What reasons did they give for all the new jobs?

Curtis R. Carlson, Ph.D.
Founder and CEO, Practice of Innovation
Former President and CEO of SRI International, 1998-2014
Website: www.practiceofinnovation.com

"Our most important innovation is the way we work."


Jordan Greenhall

Sat Jul 25 2015 13:11:41 GMT-0400 (EDT)

*promote*. I'm also interested in the thinking behind expecting >

*promote*. I'm also interested in the thinking behind expecting > jobs
from IOT.

On Sun, Jul 19, 2015 at 1:11 PM, Curt Carlson […]


Robert Cohen

Sun Jul 26 2015 12:58:00 GMT-0400 (EDT)

Hi Marjory,

That's a very interesting question as a follow-on.

While there

Hi Marjory,

That's a very interesting question as a follow-on.

While there probably will be a tick up in jobs due to the deployment of sensor networks, there are some reasons why the rise of IOT could be more durable.

First, a number of the systems being built will be the foundation for new systems to manage connected cars, connected networks for patient care and for genomic plus treatment networks as well as connected devices.

Second, these systems will not only provide jobs to build the sensor networks but also jobs to analyze the data the networks collect (there are about 200,000 jobs for data analysts posted this year), jobs to help manage the data collected, and jobs to build systems for cars, hospitals, and homes. In healthcare, we already know that when genomic and treatment data are combined, the savings in traditional treatment are already quantifiable in terms of reduced patient days in the hospital. These savings are now shifting into data analysis since health is becoming more data-based. This is resulting in new data analysis and treatment analysis positions. At one health care provider I know, about 700-1000 such jobs will be created over the next three years. This kind of shift in spending may result in "job trade offs" where there's less demand for doctors, nurses and other Heath professionals but a big upswing in jobs on the data analysis side.

Third, with lots of new sensor infrastructure, it's like that the cost of using this infrastructure will drop substantially. This would provide an opportunity for many on-demand services companies such as Lyft and others to expand their business and networks, for health providers to support networks of wearable healthcare devices, and for other mobile based businesses to benefit from the new meshed infrastructure.

So while many of the estimates for the economic benefits of IOT are based on a 1% gain in efficiency for different connected devices (see the GE and other studies) with savings running into the trillions we don't know if such efficiencies will result in spending on new jobs.

I think that there are some "green shoots" of growth showing where new jobs will grow. I think more analysis is needed but the situation is not as bleak as some commentators have suggested.

Bob

Sent from my iPhone

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