Innovation for Jobs

Innovation for Jobs

ECO workshop: Emerging Economies

David A Nordfors

Mon Jan 25 2016 16:45:43 GMT-0500 (EST)

All – here is Deepa’s workshop description. First the pitch,

All – here is Deepa’s workshop description. First the pitch, then the example. Thoughts? Here is the Workshop Google Doc: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1zxPyJB6VNGSMl6W4CeOTC-QoDIEXNBYwCVhi3x70c50/edit?usp=sharing
(everyone has commenting rights, Deepa has editing rights)

If anyone has practical experience of being an entrepreneur elevating human capital in emerging economies, your own experiences are very valuable in this discussion.

Emerging Economies
Workshop Leader: Deepa Prahalad

Emerging economies are growing and evolving at a rapid pace. The lack of legacy systems and the scale of challenges allows for experimentation and the ability to reinvent “how things are done” across industries. New technologies worldwide are making these markets accessible to organizations of all sizes. Emerging markets are a tremendous source of learning that can be leveraged in all markets. This workshop will include cases from around the world and a focus on how companies/ entrepreneurs can adapt their models to suit a diverse set of conditions.

=======

Emerging markets today represent a complex set of conditions – impressive GDP growth in many countries coexists with persistent poverty and rising inequality. An estimated 50% of the world population still lives on less than $2.50 per day. Technology has been readily accepted by all segments of society, including the poor, but platforms to engage many of these new consumers have yet to be created.

For companies and entrepreneurs alike, emerging markets provide not only a new set of consumers, but an opportunity to innovate faster and have a wider social impact. However, the traditional paradigm of filling unmet consumer needs explains very little of what has actually been adopted at scale in emerging markets. Companies will have to deeply understand consumer aspirations and improve the physical environment as they offer new technology. Although this process is challenging, it provides enormous opportunities employment, increased engagement and the development of scalable solutions. This workshop will look at cases from around the world and have an interactive discussion around questions such as How can we understand the consumer thought process in very different environments? What kind of business models are needed to reach vulnerable populations? How can the learning from these markets be leveraged to address inequality on a global basis? What are the capabilities firms need to compete effectively?


Curt Carlson

Tue Jan 26 2016 19:03:08 GMT-0500 (EST)

David—thanks. Here is my draft. Thoughts anyone?

Topic Name: Discipline of

David—thanks. Here is my draft. Thoughts anyone?

Topic Name: Discipline of Innovation

Workshop Leader: Curt Carlson

Definition: Innovation is the creation and delivery of new customer value in the marketplace with a sustainable business model. Innovation is the primary source of economic prosperity, growth, and new jobs. These in turn provide the resources required for social responsibility, environmental sustainability, and national security. We are in the global innovation economy, which has unlimited opportunities, exponentially improving technologies, unprecedented and growing competition, and a host of new business models. Creative destruction has never been more intense. Our innovation concepts and processes, the “disciple of innovation”, define how we create and deliver new customer value to society.

Narrative: Today’s innovative performance is relatively poor. Middle class jobs are disappearing while lower-paying jobs are increasing. Our innovation processes have not adopted to the challenges of the world’s economic ecosystem. Experience suggests that less than 20% of R&D and value-creation initiatives in companies and national laboratories have any value for the enterprise. Since the U.S. spends over $400B per year in R&D this implies enormous waste of financial and human resources. Today very few companies, universities, national laboratories, and government agencies have comprehensive discipline of innovation “playbooks” to systematically create major new innovations. Improving the U.S. and world’s innovative output by even a few percent could have a large positive impact on society. To address this challenge, three trends are emerging around the world:

1. New innovation methodologies in industry to remain competitive (e.g., Agile, SCRUM, and Innovation-for-Impact)

2. New government initiatives using innovation best practices to create more impactful R&D and commercial innovations (e.g., US NSF and Singapore NRF)

3. New team-based educational curricula that include the fundamentals of innovative success to develop the workforce required (e.g., Finland’s Aalto, Stanford’s d.school, WPI’s Plan)

Which innovative practices and educational programs would have the biggest positive impact? Which skills are most needed by professionals in the future? If these practices and skills were widely understood and used, how much might innovative output be improved? Could it be doubled? How much would GDP growth be improved per year? Would these developments improve productivity and create new jobs — or could the loss of middle class jobs even be accelerated?

Curtis R. Carlson, Ph.D.
Founder and CEO Practice of Innovation
President and CEO SRI International, 1998-2014
Website: www.practiceofinnovation.com<https://www.practiceofinnovation.com>
650 796 5964
Our most important innovation is the way we work

All – here is Deepa’s workshop description. First the pitch, then the example. Thoughts? Here is the Workshop Google Doc: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1zxPyJB6VNGSMl6W4CeOTC-QoDIEXNBYwCVhi3x70c50/edit?usp=sharing (everyone has commenting rights, Deepa has editing rights) If anyone has practical experience of being an entrepreneur elevating human capital in emerging economies, your own experiences are very valuable in this discussion.

Emerging Economies
Workshop Leader: Deepa Prahalad

Emerging economies are growing and evolving at a rapid pace. The lack of legacy systems and the scale of challenges allows for experimentation and the ability to reinvent “how things are done” across industries. New technologies worldwide are making these markets accessible to organizations of all sizes. Emerging markets are a tremendous source of learning that can be leveraged in all markets. This workshop will include cases from around the world and a focus on how companies/ entrepreneurs can adapt their models to suit a diverse set of conditions.

=======

Emerging markets today represent a complex set of conditions – impressive GDP growth in many countries coexists with persistent poverty and rising inequality. An estimated 50% of the world population still lives on less than $2.50 per day. Technology has been readily accepted by all segments of society, including the poor, but platforms to engage many of these new consumers have yet to be created.

For companies and entrepreneurs alike, emerging markets provide not only a new set of consumers, but an opportunity to innovate faster and have a wider social impact. However, the traditional paradigm of filling unmet consumer needs explains very little of what has actually been adopted at scale in emerging markets. Companies will have to deeply understand consumer aspirations and improve the physical environment as they offer new technology. Although this process is challenging, it provides enormous opportunities employment, increased engagement and the development of scalable solutions. This workshop will look at cases from around the world and have an interactive discussion around questions such as How can we understand the consumer thought process in very different environments? What kind of business models are needed to reach vulnerable populations? How can the learning from these markets be leveraged to address inequality on a global basis? What are the capabilities firms need to compete effectively?


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Curt Carlson

Tue Jan 26 2016 20:26:53 GMT-0500 (EST)

Thanks. Interesting—did you produce a report?

Hi Curt Very much like

Thanks. Interesting—did you produce a report?

Hi Curt Very much like your innovation forum framework. Agree that we are not getting enough value out of our research universities and federal labs. In a survey we did in WA state. (1400 companies) we asked where they looked for ideas to drive their innovation process. Universities and federal labs were the lowest priority source far behind customers, employees, supply chain, peer companies, start ups, industry association events, conferences. There are issues on the supply side (push) and demand side (pull) that need attention. Egils

Egils Milbergs
Center for Accelerating Innovation
www.accinnov.com<http://www.accinnov.com/>
[…]
M: 202.256.5506

On Jan 26, 2016, at 4:03 PM, Curt Carlson […] wrote:

David—thanks. Here is my draft. Thoughts anyone?

Topic Name: Discipline of Innovation

Workshop Leader: Curt Carlson

Definition: Innovation is the creation and delivery of new customer value in the marketplace with a sustainable business model. Innovation is the primary source of economic prosperity, growth, and new jobs. These in turn provide the resources required for social responsibility, environmental sustainability, and national security. We are in the global innovation economy, which has unlimited opportunities, exponentially improving technologies, unprecedented and growing competition, and a host of new business models. Creative destruction has never been more intense. Our innovation concepts and processes, the “disciple of innovation”, define how we create and deliver new customer value to society.

Narrative: Today’s innovative performance is relatively poor. Middle class jobs are disappearing while lower-paying jobs are increasing. Our innovation processes have not adopted to the challenges of the world’s economic ecosystem. Experience suggests that less than 20% of R&D and value-creation initiatives in companies and national laboratories have any value for the enterprise. Since the U.S. spends over $400B per year in R&D this implies enormous waste of financial and human resources. Today very few companies, universities, national laboratories, and government agencies have comprehensive discipline of innovation “playbooks” to systematically create major new innovations. Improving the U.S. and world’s innovative output by even a few percent could have a large positive impact on society. To address this challenge, three trends are emerging around the world:
1. New innovation methodologies in industry to remain competitive (e.g., Agile, SCRUM, and Innovation-for-Impact)
2. New government initiatives using innovation best practices to create more impactful R&D and commercial innovations (e.g., US NSF and Singapore NRF)
3. New team-based educational curricula that include the fundamentals of innovative success to develop the workforce required (e.g., Finland’s Aalto, Stanford’s d.school, WPI’s Plan)

Which innovative practices and educational programs would have the biggest positive impact? Which skills are most needed by professionals in the future? If these practices and skills were widely understood and used, how much might innovative output be improved? Could it be doubled? How much would GDP growth be improved per year? Would these developments improve productivity and create new jobs — or could the loss of middle class jobs even be accelerated?

Curtis R. Carlson, Ph.D.
Founder and CEO Practice of Innovation
President and CEO SRI International, 1998-2014
Website: www.practiceofinnovation.com<https://www.practiceofinnovation.com/>
650 796 5964
Our most important innovation is the way we work

All – here is Deepa’s workshop description. First the pitch, then the example. Thoughts? Here is the Workshop Google Doc: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1zxPyJB6VNGSMl6W4CeOTC-QoDIEXNBYwCVhi3x70c50/edit?usp=sharing (everyone has commenting rights, Deepa has editing rights) If anyone has practical experience of being an entrepreneur elevating human capital in emerging economies, your own experiences are very valuable in this discussion.

Emerging Economies
Workshop Leader: Deepa Prahalad

Emerging economies are growing and evolving at a rapid pace. The lack of legacy systems and the scale of challenges allows for experimentation and the ability to reinvent “how things are done” across industries. New technologies worldwide are making these markets accessible to organizations of all sizes. Emerging markets are a tremendous source of learning that can be leveraged in all markets. This workshop will include cases from around the world and a focus on how companies/ entrepreneurs can adapt their models to suit a diverse set of conditions.

=======

Emerging markets today represent a complex set of conditions – impressive GDP growth in many countries coexists with persistent poverty and rising inequality. An estimated 50% of the world population still lives on less than $2.50 per day. Technology has been readily accepted by all segments of society, including the poor, but platforms to engage many of these new consumers have yet to be created.

For companies and entrepreneurs alike, emerging markets provide not only a new set of consumers, but an opportunity to innovate faster and have a wider social impact. However, the traditional paradigm of filling unmet consumer needs explains very little of what has actually been adopted at scale in emerging markets. Companies will have to deeply understand consumer aspirations and improve the physical environment as they offer new technology. Although this process is challenging, it provides enormous opportunities employment, increased engagement and the development of scalable solutions. This workshop will look at cases from around the world and have an interactive discussion around questions such as How can we understand the consumer thought process in very different environments? What kind of business models are needed to reach vulnerable populations? How can the learning from these markets be leveraged to address inequality on a global basis? What are the capabilities firms need to compete effectively?


Forum members, join https://i4j.info<https://i4j.info/> to get access to the searchable library of discussion threads

Visit this group at https://groups.google.com/a/i4jsummit.org/group/i4j2015/.
To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/i4jsummit.org/d/msgid/i4j2015/27AE1383-ADCB-4529-9C6E-F70DD54587D9%40iiij.org<https://groups.google.com/a/i4jsummit.org/d/msgid/i4j2015/27AE1383-ADCB-4529-9C6E-F70DD54587D9%40iiij.org?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>.
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For more options, visit 1870df37cf9c4e99f12b7ead67b006a1899dad90.

Curtis R. Carlson, Ph.D.
Founder and CEO Practice of Innovation
President and CEO SRI International, 1998-2014
Website: 705a544f9a1ef124c57c409a3b25c39ea4b3c81d<https://www.practiceofinnovation.com>
650 796 5964
Our most important innovation is the way we work


martin kenney

Tue Jan 26 2016 20:47:45 GMT-0500 (EST)

Federal labs have never been a source of innovation —

Federal labs have never been a source of innovation — they are focused on
secrecy.

Your survey results are typical of all random surveys of firms (and in the
journal that I am editor at Research Policy has shown this over and
over)…universities always are least important as a source of innovations
and when universities are classified as important, for most firms it is our
graduates that are most important…having said this and understood that
universities are relatively small organizations in all societies, many of
the Schumpeterian innovations over the last five decades have been shown to
have a university component to them.

The most dynamic industrial clusters in IT and biomedical have universities
as critical components of their regions. As my book referenced below
demonstrates in the case of the UC system.

I am sure Curt will vouch for the fact that important individuals such as
Doug Englebart began their craft in universities and stayed loosely related
to universities for their entire career.

BSD Unix, semiconductor design software, time sharing etc all had
university roots. Bell Labs, Yorktown Heights, and PARC — all had very
strong relationships with top research universities.

I would suggest that investment in university research has returned more
benefits to our society on a $ for $ basis than nearly any other
investment. I believe the historical record shows this.

When the rest of the world looks at the US, the thing that they most want
to replicate is our research universities and SIlicon Valley. They may be
wrong, but none of them believe their universities are working as well as
ours.

My biased two cents.

MK

On Tue, Jan 26, 2016 at 5:26 PM, Curt Carlson […]


Curt Carlson

Tue Jan 26 2016 21:04:56 GMT-0500 (EST)

I also think you are right. Our university system is

I also think you are right. Our university system is our crown jewel.
Also true what you say about Fed. Labs. They are best when they do what no one else can do — top secret stuff. But even then their productivity is low — not much better overall than the Soviet Union. Secrecy kills innovation. But note, some parts are terrific. This realization is why DARPA was created.

Federal labs have never been a source of innovation — they are focused on secrecy.

Your survey results are typical of all random surveys of firms (and in the journal that I am editor at Research Policy has shown this over and over)…universities always are least important as a source of innovations and when universities are classified as important, for most firms it is our graduates that are most important…having said this and understood that universities are relatively small organizations in all societies, many of the Schumpeterian innovations over the last five decades have been shown to have a university component to them.

The most dynamic industrial clusters in IT and biomedical have universities as critical components of their regions. As my book referenced below demonstrates in the case of the UC system.

I am sure Curt will vouch for the fact that important individuals such as Doug Englebart began their craft in universities and stayed loosely related to universities for their entire career.

BSD Unix, semiconductor design software, time sharing etc all had university roots. Bell Labs, Yorktown Heights, and PARC — all had very strong relationships with top research universities.

I would suggest that investment in university research has returned more benefits to our society on a $ for $ basis than nearly any other investment. I believe the historical record shows this.

When the rest of the world looks at the US, the thing that they most want to replicate is our research universities and SIlicon Valley. They may be wrong, but none of them believe their universities are working as well as ours.

My biased two cents.

MK

On Tue, Jan 26, 2016 at 5:26 PM, Curt Carlson […] wrote:
Thanks. Interesting—did you produce a report?

On Jan 26, 2016, at 4:21 PM, EGILS MILBERGS […] wrote:

Hi Curt Very much like your innovation forum framework. Agree that we are not getting enough value out of our research universities and federal labs. In a survey we did in WA state. (1400 companies) we asked where they looked for ideas to drive their innovation process. Universities and federal labs were the lowest priority source far behind customers, employees, supply chain, peer companies, start ups, industry association events, conferences. There are issues on the supply side (push) and demand side (pull) that need attention. Egils

Egils Milbergs
Center for Accelerating Innovation
www.accinnov.com<http://www.accinnov.com/>
[…]
M: 202.256.5506<tel:202.256.5506>

On Jan 26, 2016, at 4:03 PM, Curt Carlson […] wrote:

David—thanks. Here is my draft. Thoughts anyone?

Topic Name: Discipline of Innovation

Workshop Leader: Curt Carlson

Definition: Innovation is the creation and delivery of new customer value in the marketplace with a sustainable business model. Innovation is the primary source of economic prosperity, growth, and new jobs. These in turn provide the resources required for social responsibility, environmental sustainability, and national security. We are in the global innovation economy, which has unlimited opportunities, exponentially improving technologies, unprecedented and growing competition, and a host of new business models. Creative destruction has never been more intense. Our innovation concepts and processes, the “disciple of innovation”, define how we create and deliver new customer value to society.

Narrative: Today’s innovative performance is relatively poor. Middle class jobs are disappearing while lower-paying jobs are increasing. Our innovation processes have not adopted to the challenges of the world’s economic ecosystem. Experience suggests that less than 20% of R&D and value-creation initiatives in companies and national laboratories have any value for the enterprise. Since the U.S. spends over $400B per year in R&D this implies enormous waste of financial and human resources. Today very few companies, universities, national laboratories, and government agencies have comprehensive discipline of innovation “playbooks” to systematically create major new innovations. Improving the U.S. and world’s innovative output by even a few percent could have a large positive impact on society. To address this challenge, three trends are emerging around the world:
1. New innovation methodologies in industry to remain competitive (e.g., Agile, SCRUM, and Innovation-for-Impact)
2. New government initiatives using innovation best practices to create more impactful R&D and commercial innovations (e.g., US NSF and Singapore NRF)
3. New team-based educational curricula that include the fundamentals of innovative success to develop the workforce required (e.g., Finland’s Aalto, Stanford’s d.school, WPI’s Plan)

Which innovative practices and educational programs would have the biggest positive impact? Which skills are most needed by professionals in the future? If these practices and skills were widely understood and used, how much might innovative output be improved? Could it be doubled? How much would GDP growth be improved per year? Would these developments improve productivity and create new jobs — or could the loss of middle class jobs even be accelerated?

Curtis R. Carlson, Ph.D.
Founder and CEO Practice of Innovation
President and CEO SRI International, 1998-2014
Website: www.practiceofinnovation.com<https://www.practiceofinnovation.com/>
650 796 5964<tel:650%20796%205964>
Our most important innovation is the way we work

All – here is Deepa’s workshop description. First the pitch, then the example. Thoughts? Here is the Workshop Google Doc: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1zxPyJB6VNGSMl6W4CeOTC-QoDIEXNBYwCVhi3x70c50/edit?usp=sharing (everyone has commenting rights, Deepa has editing rights) If anyone has practical experience of being an entrepreneur elevating human capital in emerging economies, your own experiences are very valuable in this discussion.

Emerging Economies
Workshop Leader: Deepa Prahalad

Emerging economies are growing and evolving at a rapid pace. The lack of legacy systems and the scale of challenges allows for experimentation and the ability to reinvent “how things are done” across industries. New technologies worldwide are making these markets accessible to organizations of all sizes. Emerging markets are a tremendous source of learning that can be leveraged in all markets. This workshop will include cases from around the world and a focus on how companies/ entrepreneurs can adapt their models to suit a diverse set of conditions.

=======

Emerging markets today represent a complex set of conditions – impressive GDP growth in many countries coexists with persistent poverty and rising inequality. An estimated 50% of the world population still lives on less than $2.50 per day. Technology has been readily accepted by all segments of society, including the poor, but platforms to engage many of these new consumers have yet to be created.

For companies and entrepreneurs alike, emerging markets provide not only a new set of consumers, but an opportunity to innovate faster and have a wider social impact. However, the traditional paradigm of filling unmet consumer needs explains very little of what has actually been adopted at scale in emerging markets. Companies will have to deeply understand consumer aspirations and improve the physical environment as they offer new technology. Although this process is challenging, it provides enormous opportunities employment, increased engagement and the development of scalable solutions. This workshop will look at cases from around the world and have an interactive discussion around questions such as How can we understand the consumer thought process in very different environments? What kind of business models are needed to reach vulnerable populations? How can the learning from these markets be leveraged to address inequality on a global basis? What are the capabilities firms need to compete effectively?


Forum members, join https://i4j.info<https://i4j.info/> to get access to the searchable library of discussion threads

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For more options, visit 1870df37cf9c4e99f12b7ead67b006a1899dad90.

Curtis R. Carlson, Ph.D.
Founder and CEO Practice of Innovation
President and CEO SRI International, 1998-2014
Website: 705a544f9a1ef124c57c409a3b25c39ea4b3c81d<393c129a6c123fbde4426682a933071b28325252>
650 796 5964<tel:650%20796%205964>
Our most important innovation is the way we work


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Martin Kenney
Professor
Community and Regional Development Program
1 Shields Avenue
University of California, Davis
Davis, CA 95616
(530) 574-5943
[…]
Website: http://hcd.ucdavis.edu/faculty/webpages/kenney/

and

Senior Project Director
Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy<http://www.brie.berkeley.edu/>

Are you interested in how public universities contribute to economic development? Check out –Public Universities and Regional Development: Insights from the University of California<http://www.sup.org/books/title/?id=24148> (with David Mowery)

China is becoming an innovator, but what are the challenges it faces? Check out — China's Innovation Challenge: Overcoming the Middle-Income Trap<http://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/management/international-business/chinas-innovation-challenge-overcoming-middle-income-trap> (with Arie Lewin and Johann Peter Murmann)


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Curtis R. Carlson, Ph.D.
Founder and CEO Practice of Innovation
President and CEO SRI International, 1998-2014
Website: 705a544f9a1ef124c57c409a3b25c39ea4b3c81d<https://www.practiceofinnovation.com>
650 796 5964
Our most important innovation is the way we work


Tatyana

Tue Jan 26 2016 21:38:24 GMT-0500 (EST)

Agree with you all!
I am working with NIH & recently

Agree with you all!
I am working with NIH & recently submitted joint proposal for SBIR NIH grant with the researcher from UCSF . NIH is trying to put more emphasis on funding projects that will result in workable & usable products . So far the % of those is very low. They encourage partnerships between researchers & tech startups – this combo will enable the output that can benefit many.
I think we should let researchers do what they do best : research & help them finding product / tech teams to partner with to create marketable & sellable solutions.

Tatyana

Sent from my iPhone


Esko Kilpi

Wed Jan 27 2016 04:42:46 GMT-0500 (EST)

This is important. Thank you Martin!

Esko

This is important. Thank you Martin!

Esko

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